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 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 8-10

A questionnaire survey of dental students' attitude toward denture cleansing


Department of Prosthodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication7-Sep-2017

Correspondence Address:
M Namrata
127, Dev Darshan Apartments, 1, Barnaby Road, Kilpauk, Chennai - 600 010, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijofr.ijofr_12_16

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  Abstract 


Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the dental students' attitude and preference toward denture cleansing methods using a questionnaire survey. Materials and Methods: This survey was conducted on 200 undergraduate dental students of Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals. Data were collected using a questionnaire consisting of questions regarding students' opinions, viewpoints, and recommendations about denture cleansing routines. Results: A total of 200 students studying in final year and interns were reviewed in this study. About 78% of students felt denture hygiene is important to maintain esthetics and longevity of the denture. In the present study, 63% of the patients recommended mechanical method, 35% combination, and 2% chemical method. Regarding the frequency of denture cleansing, 40% of students recommended denture cleansing more than thrice a day, 37% recommended twice a day, and 23% once a day. This study reveals only 10% of students were aware of commercially available brands of cleansers in the market, 3% were aware of side effects, and only 2% were aware of recent advanced methods of denture cleansing. Conclusion: Despite having theoretical knowledge, most of students do not give importance to proper denture hygiene maintenance in patients. As dental professional students must take responsibility for their patients' health even after treatment, students should update themselves about new materials available in the market to create the denture hygiene practice efficient among the patients.

Keywords: Dental students, denture cleansing methods, denture hygiene


How to cite this article:
Namrata M. A questionnaire survey of dental students' attitude toward denture cleansing. Int J Orofac Res 2017;2:8-10

How to cite this URL:
Namrata M. A questionnaire survey of dental students' attitude toward denture cleansing. Int J Orofac Res [serial online] 2017 [cited 2017 Sep 21];2:8-10. Available from: http://www.ijofr.org/text.asp?2017/2/1/8/214130




  Introduction Top


Despite several advances in preventive and curative dentistry, complete dentures and removable partial dentures are the most common treatment option preferred by the patients for the rehabilitation of tooth loss. The success of the denture depends not only on accurate clinical and technical procedures carried out by the dentist but also on denture hygiene care practices followed by the patients.[1] When an acrylic denture is placed in the mouth, a coating of glycoprotein develops.[2] This thin pellicle becomes contaminated with oral debris and microorganisms. Hence, denture stained by tobacco smoke and medicines results in unpleasant taste and odor. It also favors candida microorganism growth in the denture leading to mucosal irritation. Denture care is, therefore, an imperative step to maintain denture quality, esthetics, and longevity to ensure good oral health status.

Various methods of denture cleansing are mechanical method, chemical method, or combination. The most common and widely used is the mechanical method of denture cleansing is using a brush. There are brushes specifically designed and sold commercially for this purpose.[3] Chemical denture cleansers are immersion type denture cleansers that are available in powder and tablet forms. They can be broadly divided into alkaline peroxides, alkaline hypochlorite, acids (hydrochloric acid and phosphoric acid), and disinfectants (chlorhexidine gluconate and salicylate).[4] Combination of mechanical method and chemical method is the most recommended as well as effective and safe method to clean dentures, for persistent accumulations and stains.

Most of the patients learn to clean their dentures from news, media, and advertisements which can prove to be detrimental to the overall health of the uninformed patient. Hence, the dentist must educate, motivate, and instruct the patient regarding various means and methods of denture hygiene maintenance. To educate patients, a dentist should possess a thorough knowledge of the various types of cleansers, their mode of action, ingredients, their effect on dentures as well as their potential to cause allergic reactions. There have been several reports in the available dental literature concerning denture wearers' and dental practitioners attitude toward denture cleansing.[2],[5],[6],[7],[8],[9] However, there are few surveys in dental literature concerning instructions given by dental students on denture cleansing.[10] The purpose of this study was to disclose approaches and preferences of dental students about denture cleansing and their recommendations to the patients in the dental institute.


  Materials and Methods Top


This survey was conducted on 200 undergraduate dental students of Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals. Data were collected using a questionnaire consisting of questions regarding students' opinions, viewpoints, and recommendations about denture cleansing routines. Data analysis was done.


  Results Top


A total of 200 students studying in final year and interns were reviewed in this study. Among them, 50% were final years and 50% were interns. About 78% of students felt denture hygiene is important to maintain esthetics and longevity of the denture whereas 22% are not aware of its importance, but 98% of students informed and instructed their patients about denture cleansing methods after delivering new dentures and 2% failed to do so. When asked about the method of denture cleansing, 63% of students recommended mechanical method, whereas 35% recommended combination method and 2% recommended chemical method. Regarding the frequency of denture cleansing, 40% of students recommended more than thrice a day, 37% twice a day, and 23% once a day. About 88% of students suggested humid environment whereas 12% of students of suggested dry environment to store their denture. Nearly 3% of students recommended soaking of denture in immersion cleansers such as Fittydent (1%), Clinsodent (1%), and Viclean (1%) all for 1 h, whereas 97% recommend water. Majority of students (90%) are not aware of brands of denture cleansers commercially available in the market. When asked about long-term side effects of cleansing tablets and solutions, 1% of students suggested staining of the surface of acrylic denture and 2% suggested metal corrosion in cast partial denture, whereas 97% of students seemed to have no knowledge about long-term side effects. Regarding awareness about recent advanced methods of denture cleansing, majority of students (98%) had no knowledge about it, whereas 2% of the students suggested ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a recent advanced method of denture cleansing. In this study, it was found that majority of the students (83%) recalled their patients for regular review whereas 17% failed to do so.


  Discussion Top


In this survey, viewpoints and preferences of 200 students regarding the knowledge of denture cleansing to the patients were investigated.

This study reveals that 22% of students did not have knowledge of importance of denture cleansing, but only 2% of students did not give any instructions to the patients regarding denture cleansing. Even in another study [11] performed on dental practitioners showed 6.1% of practitioners did not give any instructions to their patients which is consistent with the results of the present study.

The most recommended denture cleansing frequency is once a week in cleansing solutions and once a day for brushing.[11] In the present study, 40% of students recommended brushing of dentures more than three times per day, 37% of students two times per day, and 23% of students one time per day. Only 3% of students' advice patients to soak their denture in immersion cleansers. About 88% of students advice their patients to store their denture in water, remaining 12% of students in dry environment. The results of this study were not consistent with the results of Neill's study which was performed in denture wearers. Because even though the methods and techniques of denture cleansing are implicated theoretically, students showed negligence in applying the same clinically.

The combination of brushing and soaking method was recommended as the effective way for cleaning dentures.[10],[12],[13] In the present study, 63% of the patients recommended mechanical method, 35% combination, and 2% chemical method. In another study performed on dental practitioners, 71% advice combination method which is consistent with the results of the present study. In this study, survey of students' awareness about brands, side effects, and recent advances in denture cleansers was done. It reveals only 10% of students were aware of commercially available brands of cleansers in the market, 3% were aware of side effects, and only 2% were aware of recent advanced methods of denture cleansing. This shows students' lack of knowledge and negligence in updating their knowledge of denture cleansing strategies continuously.


  Conclusion Top


More recent advanced methods of denture cleansers containing a chelating agent (EDTA)[8],[14],[15] and a mixture of enzymes (papain, lipase, amylase, and trypsin) were found to be effective in removing sordes, mucin, and heavy deposits of calculus from dentures. The cleansers were also bactericidal and fungicidal.[16],[17],[18] Despite having theoretical knowledge, most of the students do not give importance to proper denture hygiene maintenance in patients. As dental professional students must take responsibility for their patients' health even after treatment, students should update themselves about new materials available in the market to create the denture hygiene practice efficient among the patients.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Qipeng C. Denture care behaviours and denture-related quality of life of elderly denture wearers in Hong Kong. HKU Theses Online (HKUTO); 2013.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Amerena VC. Denture Cleanser Allergic Reactions and Misuse. FDA Public Health Notification: Infection Control; May/June, 2008.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Shay K. Denture hygiene: A review and update. J Contemp Dent Pract 2000;1:28-41.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Chittaranjan B. Material and methods for cleaning the dentures. Indian Journal of Dental Advancements 2011;3:423-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Neill DJ. A study of materials and methods employed in cleaning dentures. Br Dent J 1968;124:107-15.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Murtomaa H, Kononen M, Laine P. Age and main- tenance of removable dentures in Finland. J Oral Rehabil 1992;19:123-8.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Kulak-Ozkan Y, Kazazoglu E, Arikan A. Oral hygiene habits, denture cleanliness, presence of yeasts and stomatitis in elderly people. J Oral Rehabil 2002;29:300-4.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Budtz-Jørgensen E. Materials and methods for cleaning dentures. J Prosthet Dent 1979;42:619-23.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Dikbas I, Koksal T, Calikkocaoglu S. Investigation of the cleanliness of dentures in a university hospital. Int J Prosthodont 2006;19:294-8.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
Jagger DC, Harrison A. Denture cleansing – The best approach. Br Dent J 1995;178:413-7.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.
Dikbas I, Koksal T, Bal B, Ozkurt Z, Kazaoglu E. A survey of dentists' attitudes toward denture cleansing. Oral Health Dent Manag Black Sea Ctries 2006;V:7-11.  Back to cited text no. 11
    
12.
Schou L, Wight C, Cumming C. Oral hygiene habits, denture plaque, presence of yeasts and stomatitis in institutionalised elderly in Lothian, Scotland. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 1987;15:85-9.  Back to cited text no. 12
    
13.
Dills SS, Olshan AM, Goldner S, Brogdon C. Comparison of the antimicrobial capability of an abrasive paste and chemical-soak denture cleaners. J Prosthet Dent 1988;60:467-70.  Back to cited text no. 13
    
14.
Abelson DC. Denture plaque and denture cleansers. J Prosthet Dent 1981;45:376-9.  Back to cited text no. 14
    
15.
Backenstose WM, Wells JG. Side effects of immersion-type cleansers on the metal components of dentures. J Prosthet Dent 1977;37:615-21.  Back to cited text no. 15
    
16.
Kastner C, Svare CW, Scandrett FR, Kerber PE, Taylor TD, Semler HE. Effects of chemical denture cleaners on the flexibility of cast clasps. J Prosthet Dent 1983;50:473-9.  Back to cited text no. 16
    
17.
Miner JF. The nature of a denture base: A key factor in denture sore mouth. J Prosthet Dent 1973;29:250-5.  Back to cited text no. 17
    
18.
Pipko DJ, el-Sadeek M. Anin vitro investigation of abrasion and staining of dental resins. J Dent Res 1972;51:689-705.  Back to cited text no. 18
    




 

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Abstract
Introduction
Materials and Me...
Results
Discussion
Conclusion
References

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